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Friday, Aug. 22, 2014

Group raising funds for shelter

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

A group formed recently to help dogs at the Lewisburg-Marshall County Animal Shelter got its first major opportunity to raise funds for the cause in May.

"I'll make you an offer," city manager Eddie Fuller said at a meeting with the Lewisburg Animal Shelter Adoptions (LASA) group on Wednesday last week. "Would you all cook the food (hamburgers and hot dogs) and take the profit at the String Fling in Rock Creek Park on May 15?"

"Yes, yes," answered members of the group.

"OK," Fuller said. "We'll see how serious you are."

Meanwhile, there's been an outbreak of parvovirus at the shelter. A dog adopted from the shelter tested positive for parvo last week, and veterinarian Howard Warner visited Thursday morning to determine which dogs had to be euthanized because they were ill or likely to become so.

Warner determined that five dogs at the shelter were old enough to likely be immune to parvo, and they were allowed to remain, Fuller said during a telephone interview on Friday. Nine dogs are being quarantined for two weeks in a LASA member's garage. The other dogs, estimated at 15 or 16 by Fuller, were euthanized.

The floors and cages at the shelter have been disinfected by Lewisburg Animal Control Officer Willard Cates, Fuller said.

The current parvo outbreak highlights the need for quarantine procedures at the shelter, and thus a need for individual quarantine cages.

"The underlying problem is that the housing is not optimal," said Dr. Tresha Grissom of Lewisburg Animal Clinic, who also attended. Grissom was complimentary of LASA's efforts, saying, "These people have really done the research. They're focusing on helping as many dogs as possible."

During the meeting Wednesday, the group decided to proceed toward obtaining a tax-free status under section 501(c)(3) of the federal tax code. Thereafter, contributions to LASA are tax deductible. With help from Fuller, they learned that's done through an accountant, and they decided to start immediately.

At least one group member is going to get certified to assess shelter dogs to determine their suitability for adoption. This may be done by taking four online courses, at a cost of $297, at the "Humane Society University," part of its "Pets for Life" program.

Fuller agreed that as soon as a LASA member is certified to perform assessments that member may start doing that as a volunteer at the shelter.

According to discussion during LASA's meeting with Fuller, local business people have offered donations and help with fundraisers. LASA now has 540 "Fans" on its Facebook page.

Also during the meeting, Fuller granted LASA members authority to volunteer services such as answering phones and greeting visitors at the shelter. There is also a possibility that the shelter might be open on Saturday mornings, for the benefit of people who want to adopt dogs but can't get there during the week.

County Commission Chairman Billy Spivey attended the meeting, and pointed to another source of donations: men and women running for local political offices.

"Look at the list of candidates" in the newspaper, Spivey said. "None of them will be dumb enough not to give."

Fuller said there are many events this spring in Lewisburg where LASA members could distribute information and solicit donations.

The group meets again today, Wednesday, March 31, at 4 p.m. in Lewisburg City Hall.

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DOGS Again

By Karen Hall

Staff Writer

A group formed recently to help dogs at the Lewisburg-Marshall County Animal Shelter got its first major opportunity to raise funds for the cause in May.

"I'll make you an offer," city manager Eddie Fuller said at a meeting with the Lewisburg Animal Shelter Adoptions (LASA) group on Wednesday last week. "Would you all cook the food (hamburgers and hot dogs) and take the profit at the String Fling in Rock Creek Park on May 15?"

"Yes, yes," answered members of the group.

"OK," Fuller said. "We'll see how serious you are."

Meanwhile, there's been an outbreak of parvovirus at the shelter. A dog adopted from the shelter tested positive for parvo last week, and veterinarian Howard Warner visited Thursday morning to determine which dogs had to be euthanized because they were ill or likely to become so.

Warner determined that five dogs at the shelter were old enough to likely be immune to parvo, and they were allowed to remain, Fuller said during a telephone interview on Friday. Nine dogs are being quarantined for two weeks in a LASA member's garage. The other dogs, estimated at 15 or 16 by Fuller, were euthanized.

The floors and cages at the shelter have been disinfected by Lewisburg Animal Control Officer Willard Cates, Fuller said.

The current parvo outbreak highlights the need for quarantine procedures at the shelter, and thus a need for individual quarantine cages.

"The underlying problem is that the housing is not optimal," said Dr. Tresha Grissom of Lewisburg Animal Clinic, who also attended. Grissom was complimentary of LASA's efforts, saying, "These people have really done the research. They're focusing on helping as many dogs as possible."

During the meeting Wednesday, the group decided to proceed toward obtaining a tax-free status under section 501(c)(3) of the federal tax code. Thereafter, contributions to LASA are tax deductible. With help from Fuller, they learned that's done through an accountant, and they decided to start immediately.

At least one group member is going to get certified to assess shelter dogs to determine their suitability for adoption. This may be done by taking four online courses, at a cost of $297, at the "Humane Society University," part of its "Pets for Life" program.

Fuller agreed that as soon as a LASA member is certified to perform assessments that member may start doing that as a volunteer at the shelter.

According to discussion during LASA's meeting with Fuller, local business people have offered donations and help with fundraisers. LASA now has 540 "Fans" on its Facebook page.

Also during the meeting, Fuller granted LASA members authority to volunteer services such as answering phones and greeting visitors at the shelter. There is also a possibility that the shelter might be open on Saturday mornings, for the benefit of people who want to adopt dogs but can't get there during the week.

County Commission Chairman Billy Spivey attended the meeting, and pointed to another source of donations: men and women running for local political offices.

"Look at the list of candidates" in the newspaper, Spivey said. "None of them will be dumb enough not to give."

Fuller said there are many events this spring in Lewisburg where LASA members could distribute information and solicit donations.

The group meets again today, Wednesday, March 31, at 4 p.m. in Lewisburg City Hall.

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