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Boosters toasting, others need cash

Friday, January 6, 2012

This week the Marshall County High School Marching Band is to be commended for landing a $25,000 grant from Pepsi, one of America's iconic companies with marketing executives who, no doubt, would like the crowds at MCHS football games to drink their employer's product.

We could squeeze lime in a glass of the cola, toast the band, and call for the liberation of Cuba, but there might have to be another Internet contest for an award from a distillery, given the generally accepted ingredients of a beverage called Cuba Libre. Regardless of the brand of cola, take a moment to feel good about the band and its growth, resulting in the need for more and better uniforms, as well as its friends' and families' online voting. We hope our publicity for them helped them win. Pepsi is hereby recognized for its award to the band and thanked.

Meanwhile, in these first days of 2012, it's become clear that there are other needs. One is for entertainment. Another is for public safety. A third is for youth development. All need money.

One of those causes has some civic-minded businessmen and women who apparently know that investing in youth activities is an inoculation against delinquency. Take a look at our friends' announcement for the "3 on 3 Basketball Tournament" on another page in this Friday edition of your Marshall County Tribune.

Perhaps you've noticed that the Marshall County Community Theatre's heating system has failed. It was a gift from Heil-Quaker, delivered 17 years ago. Repairs may cost up to $5,000, but then it's still an old unit that's subject to another failure due to age. It's not an uncommon problem faced by building owners: Fix it or replace it. The latter initially costs more, but may save money in the long run.

There may not be a choice because repairs are all the troupe can afford.

Maybe a thespian could don white face and come out with a big sad clown frown and appeal for contributions door to door.

Heil-Quaker's donation may eventually be revealed to be similar to what a day care center received back in those days of so much employment here that people drove to Lewisburg to work at what's now called ICP. The day care center's unit was apparently a prototype and repair parts were hard to find, so a replacement was sought.

Now, an HVAC factory at Fayetteville employs a number of Marshall County residents. Perhaps a good man will make a tax-deductible donation to the theatre here.

The other organization that could use money this year is Crime Stoppers, the group organized by Norman Dalton before he was elected sheriff.

Crime Stoppers pays cash for tips that lead to the arrest of a suspect. Callers' identities are kept anonymous by numbering informants and making cash payments in an anonymous manner.

Police work led to the apprehension of one suspect in the county's most recent murder case. It wasn't through tips channeled to Crime Stoppers.

It is my speculation that the $500 limit on money for tips is too low. The way to increase that is to make the fund capable of paying higher dollar amounts. Could Sun Drop help?

Ultimately, it's more important to call Crime Stoppers at 359-4867 with information to help investigators bring culprits to justice.

These views are the author's and not necessarily reflective of the Tribune's views.