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Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014

There, at the State Fair

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

(Photo)
Tribune photos by Clint Confehr Maggie, a Shorthorn heifer, drew a red ribbon at the Tennessee State Fair when shown by Samantha Reese of Petersburg.
By Clint Confehr

Senior Staff Writer

Marshall County residents continue to manage and win at the Tennessee State Fair as the annual celebration of agriculture and American pastimes continues through next weekend in Nashville.

Samantha Reese, 15, daughter of Marty and John Reese of Reese Cattle on the Marshall County side of Petersburg, has been to the state fair every year since she was two years old because of the family business and 4-H.

"As soon as she was old enough to walk by herself, if she had a halter in her hand, she was good to go," John Reese said Saturday afternoon after Samantha and her heifer, Maggie, came back to the livestock stalls with a red ribbon.

Samantha was showing a pig named Pork Chop on Sunday. She also has a lamb to be shown.

She stays competitive by paying attention to the needs of her animals, knowing she can't take midway rides until after she's fed Maggie, groomed the heifer and cleaned the stall. She wants to become an embryologist by studying at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville so she can breed a better cattle herd.

Vanessa and Seth "Buddy" Warf of Verona Caney Road were keeping livestock records, registering entries and still having fun at the fair.

Former Marshall County resident Jim Ozburn of Nolensville remembers 1972, the year Seth beat him in an ice cream eating contest.

Seth explained he won by massaging the box to warm the ice cream before the contest started and by having friends provide a steady stream of warm metal spoons.

He was interviewed after the contest for the TV news and said he knew he could win because he ate half a gallon before the contest to be sure he could do it.

A number of other Marshall County residents are participating in events at the state fair this week, many in conjunction with the 4-H program administered through the University of Tennessee Agricultural Extension Service.